Pornographie

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Möglicherweise ist jemand interessiert daran wie sich Pornographie auf euch und eure Mitmenschen auswirkt. Hier ein paar Truthbombs für euch:

 

Porn and its Psychological Effects

In 1982 and 1984, Dr. Dolf Zillmann and Dr. Jennings Bryant conducted an experiment with 80 male and 80 female college-age participants.101 These were divided into three subgroups, and each group was shown 4 hours and 48 minutes of media over a six-week period: (1) the “Massive Exposure Group” was shown 36 non-violent pornographic film clips; (2) the “Intermediate Exposure Group” was exposed to 18 pornographic film clips and 18 regular films; and (3) the “No Exposure” control group was shown 36 non-pornographic film clips.

- A direct correlation was noticed between the amount of pornography one viewed and one’s overall sexual satisfaction. Participants from the Massive Exposure Group reported less satisfaction with their intimate partner, such as their partner’s physical appearance, affection, and sexual performance. Researchers concluded, “consumers eventually compare appearance and performance of pornographic models with that of their intimate partners, and this comparison rarely favors their intimate partners.”

- Those exposed to more pornography attached more value to casual sex (i.e. sex without emotional involvement).

- When asked if minors should be protecting from seeing pornography, 84% of the No Exposure Group, 54% of the Intermediate Exposure Group, and 37% of the Massive Exposure Group said yes.

- Porn seemed to condition participants to trivialize rape. Participants were asked to read about a legal case where a man raped a female hitchhiker and then recommend a length for the rapist’s prison sentence. Males in the No Exposure Group said 94 months; the Massive Exposure Group said 50 months (nearly half that of the No Exposure Group).

- Participants were asked to rate their overall support for women’s rights. Both men and women who were in the Massive Exposure Group showed significant drops in support compared to the No Exposure Group. There was 71% male support in the No Exposure Group compared to 25% in the Massive Exposure Group and 82% female support in the No Exposure Group compared to 52% in the Massive Exposure Group.

- When asked how common or popular certain sexual activities were in the general population — activities like anal sex, group sex, sadomasochism, and bestiality — the percentages given by the Massive Exposure Group were two to three times higher than the No Exposure Group.

- The Massive Exposure Group was far more likely to believe women fit the stereotype of the women they see in pornographic films — that is, “socially non-discriminating, as hysterically euphoric in response to just about any sexual or pseudosexual stimulation,and as eager to accommodate seemingly any and every sexual request.”

- Additionally, two weeks after they stopped seeing videos, all participants were given an assortment of pornographic and non-pornographic films to watch in private. Those who were exposed to more pornography were significantly more likely to want to watch hardcore porn.

In a 2002 study, 71 male undergraduate students were divided into 3 groups. Each group watched 10-11-minute video segments: a sexually-explicit and degrading film, a sexually-explicit educational film, and a non-sexual film. Later the men were placed side-by-side with a woman in a seemingly unrelated social experiment.

- Viewers of the sexually-explicit film displayed more dominance and anxiety, ignored contributions of their partner more often, touched their partner for longer periods of time, and averted their partner’s gaze more compared to viewers of the non-sexual film.

- Viewers of the sexually-explicit and degrading film spent longer periods of time averting their partner’s touch and gazing at their partner’s face, interrupted their partner more, advanced to touch their partner more, and made more sexual references compared to viewers of the sexually-explicit film.

In 2005, a study of youth between the ages of 10 and 17 concluded that there is a significant relationship between frequent porn use and feelings of loneliness and major depression. 

Gary R. Brooks, Ph.D., describes what he observes as a “pervasive disorder” linked to the consumption of soft- core pornography like Playboy. He mentions five main symptoms of this:

Voyeurism: An obsession with looking at women rather than interacting with them. This can apply to far more than pornography, including any consumption of the “sexuality-on-tap” culture in which we live; media glorifies and objectifies women’s bodies, thus promoting unreal images of women, feeding male obsession with visual stimulation and trivializing other mature features of a healthy sexual relationship.

Objectification: An attitude in which women are objects rated by size, shape and harmony of body parts. Sexual fantasy leads to emotional unavailability and dissatisfaction.

Validation: The need to validate masculinity through beautiful women. Women who meet centerfold standards only retain their power as long as they maintain “perfect” bodies and the lure of unavailability; it is very common for a man’s fantasy sexual encounter to include a feeling of manly validation; it is also common for men to feel invalidated by their wives if they have trained their minds and bodies to respond only to the fantasy advances of their dream girl.

Trophyism: The idea that beautiful women are collectibles who show the world who a man is. Pornography reinforces the women’s-bodies-as-trophies mentality.

Fear of True Intimacy: Inability to relate to women in an honest and intimate way despite deep loneliness. Pornography exalts a man’s sexual needs over his need for sensuality and intimacy; some men develop a preoccupation with sexuality, which powerfully handicaps their capacity for emotionally intimate relationships.

“Prolonged exposure to pornography, it must be remembered, results in both a loss of respect for female sexual autonomy and the disinhibition of men in the expression of aggression against women.” - Dr. James B. Weaver.

Porn and Addiction

10% of adults admit to having an addiction to online pornography (IFR, 2006).

In a survey of 63 wives of self-identified sex addicts:

- 70% met most criteria for a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder.
- 75% discovered evidence of compulsive or addictive sexual behaviors themselves (as opposed to a planned disclosure on the part of a husband).
- 71% demonstrated a severe level of functional impairment in major areas of their lives.
- Length of marriage at disclosure and number of prior traumatic event exposures were the best predictors increased trauma symptoms.

“[M]odern science allows us to understand that the underlying nature of an addiction to pornography is chemically nearly identical to a heroin addiction.” - Dr. Jeffrey Satinovet

“Pornography triggers a myriad of endogenous, internal, natural drugs that mimic the ‘high’ from a street drug. Addiction to pornography is addiction to what I dub erototoxins—mind altering drugs produced by the viewer’s own brain.” - Dr. Judith Reisman

Porn, Violence and Rape

88.2% of top rated porn scenes contain aggressive acts principally spanking, gagging, and slapping, while 48.7% of scenes contained verbal aggression, primarily name-calling.

- In 70% of occurrences, a man is perpetrator of the aggression; 94% of the time the act is directed towards a woman.

- Only 9.9% of the top selling scenes analyzed contained behaviors such as kissing, laughing, caressing, or verbal compliments.

- Open-hand slapping occurs in 41.1% of scenes.

- Sex depicted in porn movies generally focuses on men’s sexual pleasure and orgasm, rather than equally that of women’s (Bridges and Wosnitzer, 2007)

Porn scenes have sexist and racist themes through out. Websites often contain menus where users can select genres of women’s ethnicities, body types, and ages. There are also choices such as “amateur,” “interracial”, and the ever popular “teen” category. Men and women who are anything other than white are represented in stereotypical and demeaning ways.

Studies show that after viewing pornography men are more likely to:

- report decreased empathy for rape victims 

- have increasingly aggressive behavioral tendencies 

- report believing that a woman who dresses provocatively deserves to be raped

- report anger at women who flirt but then refuse to have sex

- report decreased sexual interest in their girlfriends or wives

- report increased interest in coercing partners into unwanted sex acts (Bridges, 2006) (Yang, Gahyun, 2012).

In a meta-analysis of 46 studies published from 1962 to 1995, comprising a total sample of 12,323 people, researchers concluded pornographic material puts one at increased risk of:

- developing sexually deviant tendencies (31% increase in risk)
- committing sexual offenses (22% increase in risk)
- accepting rape myths (31% increase in risk)

Among perpetrators of sex crimes, adolescent exposure to pornography is a significant predictor of elevated violence and victim humiliation.

In a study of 30 college fraternity members on a small liberal arts campus, the displayed images of women (in posters, screensavers, calendars, pin-ups, and advertisements) were analyzed for their frequency and degrading nature. There was a significant association between the average degradation ratings of the images and the student’s rape-supportive attitude scale (RSA)

In a study of 187 female university students, researchers concluded early exposure to pornography was related to subsequent “rape fantasies” and attitudes supportive of sexual violence against women. Researchers believe pornography consumed at a young age contributes to women being socialized to accept sexual aggression as a sexual/romantic event.

In 2004 data was collected from interviews with 271 women participating in a battered women’s program. Pornography use by their partner significantly increased the odds of women being sexually abused by their abusers. When their abuser used both alcohol and pornography, the odds of sexual abuse increase by a factor of 3.2.

Arrested prostitution clients are twice as likely to report having watched pornographic movies over the past year than a national sample.

Japanese males were divided into three groups and each exposed to different types of home video pornography: a positive rape film (where the female expressed pleasure), a negative rape film (where the female expressed pain), or a consenting sex film. Those who viewed the positive rape film were significantly more likely to state that women could enjoy rape and higher percentages of rape cases are invented by victims.

In a study of 804 Italian adolescents, ages 14 to 19 years old, viewing pornography was correlated to both active and passive sexual violence and unwanted sex.

“Women are represented as passive and as slavishly dependent upon men. The role of female characters is limited to the provision of sexual services to men. To the extent that women’s sexual pleasure is represented at all, it is subordinated to that of men and is never an end in itself as is the sexual pleasure of men. What pleases women is the use of their bodies to satisfy male desires. While the sexual objectification of women is common to all pornography, women are the recipients of even worse treatment in violent pornography, in which women characters are killed, tortured, gang-raped, mutilated, bound, and otherwise abused, as a means of providing sexual stimulation or pleasure to the male characters.” - Helen Longino

Research indicates that 25% to 30% of male college students in the United States and Canada admit that there is some likelihood they would rape a woman if they could get away with it. (Briere and Malamuth, 1983)

In a study of high school males, 50% of those interviewed believed it acceptable “for a guy to hold a girl down and force her to have sexual intercourse in instances such as when ‘she gets him sexually excited’ or ‘she says she’s going to have sex with him and then changes her mind’”  (Goodchilds and Zellman, 1984)

“I went to a porno bookstore, put a quarter in a slot, and saw this porn movie. It was just a guy coming up from behind a girl and attacking her and raping her. That’s when I started having rape fantasies. When I saw that movie, it was like somebody lit a fuse from my childhood on up… I just went for it, went out and raped.” Rapist interviewed by Beneke, 1982

The following statements were made by women testifying at the Hearings on Pornography in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1993 (Russell, 1993a). 

- Ms. M testified that, “I agree to act out in private a lot of the scenarios that my husband read to me. These depicted bondage and different sexual acts that I found humiliating to do…He read the pornography like a textbook, like a journal. When he finally convinced me to be bound, he read in the magazine how to tie the knots and bind me in a way that I couldn’t escape. Most of the scenes where I had to dress up or go through different fantasies were the exact same scenes that he has read in the magazines.”

- Ms. O described a case in which a man ‘brought pornographic magazines, books, and paraphernalia into the bedroom with him and told her that if she did not perform the sexual acts in the “dirty” books and magazines, he would beat her and kill her’

- Ms. S testified about the experience of a group of women prostitutes who, she said, ‘were forced constantly to enact specific scenes that men had witnessed in pornography…These men… would set up scenarios, usually with more than one woman, to copy scenes that they had seen portrayed in magazines and books. [For example, Ms. S quoted a woman in her group as saying:] “He held up a porn magazine with a picture of a beaten woman and said, ‘I want you to look like that. I want you to hurt.’ He then began beating me. When I did not cry fast enough, he lit a cigarette and held it right above my breast for a long time before he burned me.”

- Ms. S. also described what three men did to a nude woman prostitute whom they had tied up while she was seated on a chair: “They burned her with cigarettes and attached nipple clips to her breasts. They had many S and M magazines with them and showed her many pictures of women appearing to consent, enjoy, and encourage this abuse. She was held for twelve hours while she was continuously raped and beaten.”

- Another example cited by Ms. S: “They (several Johns) forced the women to act simultaneously with the movie. In the movie at this point, a group of men were urinating on a naked woman. All the men in the room were able to perform this task, so they all started urinating on the woman who was now naked.” 

Non-violent heterosexual porn often becomes ‘too boring’ and leads (commonly) men to seek out more ‘interesting’ and ‘exciting’ types of pornography: often including abuse and rape. (Zillman and Bryant) (Briere and Malamuth)

Porn and Relationships

[At] a gathering of the nation’s divorce lawyers, attendees revealed that 58% of their divorces were a result of a spouse looking at excessive amounts of pornography online. 

According to the Journal of Adolescent Health, prolonged exposure to pornography leads to:

- An exaggerated perception of sexual activity in society

- Diminished trust between intimate couples

- The abandonment of the hope of sexual monogamy

- Belief that promiscuity is the natural state

- Belief that abstinence and sexual inactivity are unhealthy

- Cynicism about love or the need for affection between sexual partners

- Belief that marriage is sexually confining

- Lack of attraction to family and child-raising

According to sociologist Jill Manning, the research indicates pornography consumption is associated with the following six trends, among others:

1. Increased marital distress, and risk of separation and divorce

2. Decreased marital intimacy and sexual satisfaction

3. Infidelity 

4. Increased appetite for more graphic types of pornography and sexual activity associated with abusive, illegal or unsafe practices 

5. Devaluation of monogamy, marriage and child rearing 

6. An increasing number of people struggling with compulsive and addictive sexual behavior

In a survey of women (and some men) who experienced serious adverse consequences from their partner’s cybersex involvement:

- In 68% of the couples, one or both lost interest in relational sex: 52% of showed a decreased interest, as did 34% of partners.

- Partners commonly reported feeling hurt, betrayed, rejected, abandoned, lonely, isolated, humiliated, jealous, and angry. 

- Partners often compared themselves unfavorably to online images. 

- Partners overwhelmingly felt that cyber affairs were as emotionally painful as offline affairs.

Porn and Sexual Dysfunction

“I have also seen in my clinical experience that pornography damages the sexual performance of the viewers. Pornography viewers tend to have problems with premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction. Having spent so much time in unnatural sexual experiences with paper, celluloid and cyberspace, they seem to find it difficult to have sex with a real human being. Pornography is raising their expectation and demand for types and amounts of sexual experiences; at the same time it is reducing their ability to experience sex.” – Dr. MaryAnne Layden

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vor 10 Stunden, womyn schrieb:

Möglicherweise ist jemand interessiert daran wie sich Pornographie auf euch und eure Mitmenschen auswirkt. Hier ein paar Truthbombs für euch:

 

Porn and its Psychological Effects

In 1982 and 1984, Dr. Dolf Zillmann and Dr. Jennings Bryant conducted an experiment with 80 male and 80 female college-age participants.101 These were divided into three subgroups, and each group was shown 4 hours and 48 minutes of media over a six-week period: (1) the “Massive Exposure Group” was shown 36 non-violent pornographic film clips; (2) the “Intermediate Exposure Group” was exposed to 18 pornographic film clips and 18 regular films; and (3) the “No Exposure” control group was shown 36 non-pornographic film clips.

- A direct correlation was noticed between the amount of pornography one viewed and one’s overall sexual satisfaction. Participants from the Massive Exposure Group reported less satisfaction with their intimate partner, such as their partner’s physical appearance, affection, and sexual performance. Researchers concluded, “consumers eventually compare appearance and performance of pornographic models with that of their intimate partners, and this comparison rarely favors their intimate partners.”

- Those exposed to more pornography attached more value to casual sex (i.e. sex without emotional involvement).

- When asked if minors should be protecting from seeing pornography, 84% of the No Exposure Group, 54% of the Intermediate Exposure Group, and 37% of the Massive Exposure Group said yes.

- Porn seemed to condition participants to trivialize rape. Participants were asked to read about a legal case where a man raped a female hitchhiker and then recommend a length for the rapist’s prison sentence. Males in the No Exposure Group said 94 months; the Massive Exposure Group said 50 months (nearly half that of the No Exposure Group).

- Participants were asked to rate their overall support for women’s rights. Both men and women who were in the Massive Exposure Group showed significant drops in support compared to the No Exposure Group. There was 71% male support in the No Exposure Group compared to 25% in the Massive Exposure Group and 82% female support in the No Exposure Group compared to 52% in the Massive Exposure Group.

- When asked how common or popular certain sexual activities were in the general population — activities like anal sex, group sex, sadomasochism, and bestiality — the percentages given by the Massive Exposure Group were two to three times higher than the No Exposure Group.

- The Massive Exposure Group was far more likely to believe women fit the stereotype of the women they see in pornographic films — that is, “socially non-discriminating, as hysterically euphoric in response to just about any sexual or pseudosexual stimulation,and as eager to accommodate seemingly any and every sexual request.”

- Additionally, two weeks after they stopped seeing videos, all participants were given an assortment of pornographic and non-pornographic films to watch in private. Those who were exposed to more pornography were significantly more likely to want to watch hardcore porn.

In a 2002 study, 71 male undergraduate students were divided into 3 groups. Each group watched 10-11-minute video segments: a sexually-explicit and degrading film, a sexually-explicit educational film, and a non-sexual film. Later the men were placed side-by-side with a woman in a seemingly unrelated social experiment.

- Viewers of the sexually-explicit film displayed more dominance and anxiety, ignored contributions of their partner more often, touched their partner for longer periods of time, and averted their partner’s gaze more compared to viewers of the non-sexual film.

- Viewers of the sexually-explicit and degrading film spent longer periods of time averting their partner’s touch and gazing at their partner’s face, interrupted their partner more, advanced to touch their partner more, and made more sexual references compared to viewers of the sexually-explicit film.

In 2005, a study of youth between the ages of 10 and 17 concluded that there is a significant relationship between frequent porn use and feelings of loneliness and major depression. 

Gary R. Brooks, Ph.D., describes what he observes as a “pervasive disorder” linked to the consumption of soft- core pornography like Playboy. He mentions five main symptoms of this:

Voyeurism: An obsession with looking at women rather than interacting with them. This can apply to far more than pornography, including any consumption of the “sexuality-on-tap” culture in which we live; media glorifies and objectifies women’s bodies, thus promoting unreal images of women, feeding male obsession with visual stimulation and trivializing other mature features of a healthy sexual relationship.

Objectification: An attitude in which women are objects rated by size, shape and harmony of body parts. Sexual fantasy leads to emotional unavailability and dissatisfaction.

Validation: The need to validate masculinity through beautiful women. Women who meet centerfold standards only retain their power as long as they maintain “perfect” bodies and the lure of unavailability; it is very common for a man’s fantasy sexual encounter to include a feeling of manly validation; it is also common for men to feel invalidated by their wives if they have trained their minds and bodies to respond only to the fantasy advances of their dream girl.

Trophyism: The idea that beautiful women are collectibles who show the world who a man is. Pornography reinforces the women’s-bodies-as-trophies mentality.

Fear of True Intimacy: Inability to relate to women in an honest and intimate way despite deep loneliness. Pornography exalts a man’s sexual needs over his need for sensuality and intimacy; some men develop a preoccupation with sexuality, which powerfully handicaps their capacity for emotionally intimate relationships.

“Prolonged exposure to pornography, it must be remembered, results in both a loss of respect for female sexual autonomy and the disinhibition of men in the expression of aggression against women.” - Dr. James B. Weaver.

Porn and Addiction

10% of adults admit to having an addiction to online pornography (IFR, 2006).

In a survey of 63 wives of self-identified sex addicts:

- 70% met most criteria for a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder.
- 75% discovered evidence of compulsive or addictive sexual behaviors themselves (as opposed to a planned disclosure on the part of a husband).
- 71% demonstrated a severe level of functional impairment in major areas of their lives.
- Length of marriage at disclosure and number of prior traumatic event exposures were the best predictors increased trauma symptoms.

“[M]odern science allows us to understand that the underlying nature of an addiction to pornography is chemically nearly identical to a heroin addiction.” - Dr. Jeffrey Satinovet

“Pornography triggers a myriad of endogenous, internal, natural drugs that mimic the ‘high’ from a street drug. Addiction to pornography is addiction to what I dub erototoxins—mind altering drugs produced by the viewer’s own brain.” - Dr. Judith Reisman

Porn, Violence and Rape

88.2% of top rated porn scenes contain aggressive acts principally spanking, gagging, and slapping, while 48.7% of scenes contained verbal aggression, primarily name-calling.

- In 70% of occurrences, a man is perpetrator of the aggression; 94% of the time the act is directed towards a woman.

- Only 9.9% of the top selling scenes analyzed contained behaviors such as kissing, laughing, caressing, or verbal compliments.

- Open-hand slapping occurs in 41.1% of scenes.

- Sex depicted in porn movies generally focuses on men’s sexual pleasure and orgasm, rather than equally that of women’s (Bridges and Wosnitzer, 2007)

Porn scenes have sexist and racist themes through out. Websites often contain menus where users can select genres of women’s ethnicities, body types, and ages. There are also choices such as “amateur,” “interracial”, and the ever popular “teen” category. Men and women who are anything other than white are represented in stereotypical and demeaning ways.

Studies show that after viewing pornography men are more likely to:

- report decreased empathy for rape victims 

- have increasingly aggressive behavioral tendencies 

- report believing that a woman who dresses provocatively deserves to be raped

- report anger at women who flirt but then refuse to have sex

- report decreased sexual interest in their girlfriends or wives

- report increased interest in coercing partners into unwanted sex acts (Bridges, 2006) (Yang, Gahyun, 2012).

In a meta-analysis of 46 studies published from 1962 to 1995, comprising a total sample of 12,323 people, researchers concluded pornographic material puts one at increased risk of:

- developing sexually deviant tendencies (31% increase in risk)
- committing sexual offenses (22% increase in risk)
- accepting rape myths (31% increase in risk)

Among perpetrators of sex crimes, adolescent exposure to pornography is a significant predictor of elevated violence and victim humiliation.

In a study of 30 college fraternity members on a small liberal arts campus, the displayed images of women (in posters, screensavers, calendars, pin-ups, and advertisements) were analyzed for their frequency and degrading nature. There was a significant association between the average degradation ratings of the images and the student’s rape-supportive attitude scale (RSA)

In a study of 187 female university students, researchers concluded early exposure to pornography was related to subsequent “rape fantasies” and attitudes supportive of sexual violence against women. Researchers believe pornography consumed at a young age contributes to women being socialized to accept sexual aggression as a sexual/romantic event.

In 2004 data was collected from interviews with 271 women participating in a battered women’s program. Pornography use by their partner significantly increased the odds of women being sexually abused by their abusers. When their abuser used both alcohol and pornography, the odds of sexual abuse increase by a factor of 3.2.

Arrested prostitution clients are twice as likely to report having watched pornographic movies over the past year than a national sample.

Japanese males were divided into three groups and each exposed to different types of home video pornography: a positive rape film (where the female expressed pleasure), a negative rape film (where the female expressed pain), or a consenting sex film. Those who viewed the positive rape film were significantly more likely to state that women could enjoy rape and higher percentages of rape cases are invented by victims.

In a study of 804 Italian adolescents, ages 14 to 19 years old, viewing pornography was correlated to both active and passive sexual violence and unwanted sex.

“Women are represented as passive and as slavishly dependent upon men. The role of female characters is limited to the provision of sexual services to men. To the extent that women’s sexual pleasure is represented at all, it is subordinated to that of men and is never an end in itself as is the sexual pleasure of men. What pleases women is the use of their bodies to satisfy male desires. While the sexual objectification of women is common to all pornography, women are the recipients of even worse treatment in violent pornography, in which women characters are killed, tortured, gang-raped, mutilated, bound, and otherwise abused, as a means of providing sexual stimulation or pleasure to the male characters.” - Helen Longino

Research indicates that 25% to 30% of male college students in the United States and Canada admit that there is some likelihood they would rape a woman if they could get away with it. (Briere and Malamuth, 1983)

In a study of high school males, 50% of those interviewed believed it acceptable “for a guy to hold a girl down and force her to have sexual intercourse in instances such as when ‘she gets him sexually excited’ or ‘she says she’s going to have sex with him and then changes her mind’”  (Goodchilds and Zellman, 1984)

“I went to a porno bookstore, put a quarter in a slot, and saw this porn movie. It was just a guy coming up from behind a girl and attacking her and raping her. That’s when I started having rape fantasies. When I saw that movie, it was like somebody lit a fuse from my childhood on up… I just went for it, went out and raped.” Rapist interviewed by Beneke, 1982

The following statements were made by women testifying at the Hearings on Pornography in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1993 (Russell, 1993a). 

- Ms. M testified that, “I agree to act out in private a lot of the scenarios that my husband read to me. These depicted bondage and different sexual acts that I found humiliating to do…He read the pornography like a textbook, like a journal. When he finally convinced me to be bound, he read in the magazine how to tie the knots and bind me in a way that I couldn’t escape. Most of the scenes where I had to dress up or go through different fantasies were the exact same scenes that he has read in the magazines.”

- Ms. O described a case in which a man ‘brought pornographic magazines, books, and paraphernalia into the bedroom with him and told her that if she did not perform the sexual acts in the “dirty” books and magazines, he would beat her and kill her’

- Ms. S testified about the experience of a group of women prostitutes who, she said, ‘were forced constantly to enact specific scenes that men had witnessed in pornography…These men… would set up scenarios, usually with more than one woman, to copy scenes that they had seen portrayed in magazines and books. [For example, Ms. S quoted a woman in her group as saying:] “He held up a porn magazine with a picture of a beaten woman and said, ‘I want you to look like that. I want you to hurt.’ He then began beating me. When I did not cry fast enough, he lit a cigarette and held it right above my breast for a long time before he burned me.”

- Ms. S. also described what three men did to a nude woman prostitute whom they had tied up while she was seated on a chair: “They burned her with cigarettes and attached nipple clips to her breasts. They had many S and M magazines with them and showed her many pictures of women appearing to consent, enjoy, and encourage this abuse. She was held for twelve hours while she was continuously raped and beaten.”

- Another example cited by Ms. S: “They (several Johns) forced the women to act simultaneously with the movie. In the movie at this point, a group of men were urinating on a naked woman. All the men in the room were able to perform this task, so they all started urinating on the woman who was now naked.” 

Non-violent heterosexual porn often becomes ‘too boring’ and leads (commonly) men to seek out more ‘interesting’ and ‘exciting’ types of pornography: often including abuse and rape. (Zillman and Bryant) (Briere and Malamuth)

Porn and Relationships

[At] a gathering of the nation’s divorce lawyers, attendees revealed that 58% of their divorces were a result of a spouse looking at excessive amounts of pornography online. 

According to the Journal of Adolescent Health, prolonged exposure to pornography leads to:

- An exaggerated perception of sexual activity in society

- Diminished trust between intimate couples

- The abandonment of the hope of sexual monogamy

- Belief that promiscuity is the natural state

- Belief that abstinence and sexual inactivity are unhealthy

- Cynicism about love or the need for affection between sexual partners

- Belief that marriage is sexually confining

- Lack of attraction to family and child-raising

According to sociologist Jill Manning, the research indicates pornography consumption is associated with the following six trends, among others:

1. Increased marital distress, and risk of separation and divorce

2. Decreased marital intimacy and sexual satisfaction

3. Infidelity 

4. Increased appetite for more graphic types of pornography and sexual activity associated with abusive, illegal or unsafe practices 

5. Devaluation of monogamy, marriage and child rearing 

6. An increasing number of people struggling with compulsive and addictive sexual behavior

In a survey of women (and some men) who experienced serious adverse consequences from their partner’s cybersex involvement:

- In 68% of the couples, one or both lost interest in relational sex: 52% of showed a decreased interest, as did 34% of partners.

- Partners commonly reported feeling hurt, betrayed, rejected, abandoned, lonely, isolated, humiliated, jealous, and angry. 

- Partners often compared themselves unfavorably to online images. 

- Partners overwhelmingly felt that cyber affairs were as emotionally painful as offline affairs.

Porn and Sexual Dysfunction

“I have also seen in my clinical experience that pornography damages the sexual performance of the viewers. Pornography viewers tend to have problems with premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction. Having spent so much time in unnatural sexual experiences with paper, celluloid and cyberspace, they seem to find it difficult to have sex with a real human being. Pornography is raising their expectation and demand for types and amounts of sexual experiences; at the same time it is reducing their ability to experience sex.” – Dr. MaryAnne Layden

Zusammengefasst also: no porn, weil böse.

Ok. Ist mir aber relativ wurscht.

 

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Schon X Mal auf deutsch (in dieser Sprache sind Beiträge hier zu halten) hier diskutiert.

Suchfunktion: No Porn

Unter anderem:

 

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